FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

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  1. How are the songs selected that are played on KoHoSo Radio 66?
  2. Why does KoHoSo Radio 66 only play songs released from 1946 through 1966?
  3. Why doesn’t KoHoSo Radio 66 play all the big hit novelty songs?
  4. Why do you play songs from New Zealand and Australia that were not hits in the USA or UK?
  5. How can you name yourself after Route 66 when you play songs that were not made in America?
  6. Can I request a song or artist?
  7. How can I contact you?
  8. Why are some KoHoSo Radio 66 streams blocked in my country?
  9. Who else besides me is listening to KoHoSo Radio 66?
  10. How do you know somebody is listening in a certain state or country?
  11. How does KoHoSo pay for the station?
  12. If KoHoSo Radio 66 is commercial free, why do I sometimes hear advertisements?
  13. What happened to Survive-All Shelters?
  14. Where did you get the old jingles?
  15. What is that weird computer voice in some of the jingles?
  16. Is that extremely high female voice in some of the jingles real?
  17. Where do you get the cover art?
  18. Why do I not recognize the cover art?
  19. Why did KoHoSo Radio 66 go offline for so long?
  20. Do you have t-shirts or stickers available?
  21. When can I hear Cruisin’ with KoHoSo?
  22. What is the opening/closing theme song music used on Cruisin’ with KoHoSo?
  23. Where did KoHoSo work in radio?
  24. Who is Miss KoKo?
  25. What happened to the computer voice announcers?
  26. Where are Crestline and the San Bernardino Mountains?
  27. Why are you not on Bose SoundTouch?
  28. What equipment, programs, and services do you use?
  29. What is the secret that makes KoHoSo Radio 66 so good compared to other oldies stations?
1. How are the songs selected that are played on KoHoSo Radio 66?

Mainly by ear. KoHoSo will go through an artist’s entire catalog and listen for any song that he feels has stood the test of time. If it sounds like something that truly fits in the post-World War II era but would still be appealing to the modern ear, it goes into the station’s rotation (playlist) regardless of whether it was a big hit, a B-side, only regionally known, or an album cut. While KoHoSo gives more weight to a song that made Billboard‘s Top 40 list, he wants to bring you more of an overall sound and feeling instead of being like other "oldies" stations that do nothing but repeat the same hits over and over again.

2. Why does KoHoSo Radio 66 only play songs released from 1946 through 1966?

After much consideration before KoHoSo Radio 66 first went online, KoHoSo decided those were the best possible starting and ending points. KoHoSo felt he really needed to make absolute rules on this as, otherwise, the playlist would be too wide and ruin the sound and mood of the station. The final limits came inspired by KoHoSo’s decision to use old U.S. Route 66 as the station’s branding and overall identity. The end came first as, while musical styles are an ever-flowing river, there is no doubt there is a big change that came in 1967. It becomes difficult to start blending in the Doors, Jefferson Airplane, Jimi Hendrix, and Cream with doo-wop and such while retaining a Route 66 older-style-rock identity. As for the beginning, that was a bit easier as 1946 was the first full year all the English-speaking nations were no longer on a war footing and when Nat King Cole released (Get Your Kicks On) Route 66. Of course, KoHoSo Radio 66 does not play nearly as much late 1940s music as it does from other years. However, those days leading into the 1950s had quite a few songs that were not only of high quality but did not sound like big band and, especially with the black artists, also foretold what was to come in both rock & roll and R&B.

3. Why doesn’t KoHoSo Radio 66 play all the big hit novelty songs?

While the post-World War II era was a golden age for novelty songs, they are something that create very strong feelings. People either love them or hate them. KoHoSo is actually a big lover of novelty songs as, in his younger days, he faithfully tape recorded The Dr. Demento Show every week. In addition to many people hating novelty songs, they also force a listener to pay close attention. One might think that’s a good thing but that is not always true with radio. The best stations simultaneously work well at high volume or as something in the background. If the people having a station on in the background find something distracting, they go somewhere else. We want people to be able to listen to KoHoSo Radio 66 for hours on end without those using it as background music finding something annoying. Of course, many things our station plays border on being a novelty as much early rock & roll had a good slice of humor to it so it’s not a solid line (a prime example of this is the Coasters). Let’s just say, while we will play Monster Mash in the few days leading up to Halloween, you will never hear KoHoSo Radio 66 play anything by fictional rodents.

No Chipmunks

Rodents found anywhere in the immediate vicinity of the KoHoSo Radio 66 studios will be dealt with in the harshest possible terms by our friendly neighborhood cat army or via unrestricted chemical warfare.


4. Why do you play songs from New Zealand and Australia that were not hits in the USA or UK?

Because they are great songs that fit right in with all the others and deserve to be heard.

5. How can you name yourself after Route 66 when you play songs that were not made in America?

Because the spirit of Route 66 does not end at the Santa Monica Pier. Because the legends and ideals of the Mother Road have spread all over the world, even into places like China. Because Route 66 and all the other old highways, byways, and Main Streets of America were still vital when the Beatles and other early British Invasion artists were blaring out of radio and jukebox speakers at the old mom-and-pop hamburger stands before fast food chains and interstate highways fully took over. And, even though it is an ideal that was not true in its time…because today’s Route 66 is for everybody.

6. Can I request a song or artist?

Yes and no. You can request a song or artist to be added to the rotation (playlist). If KoHoSo feels it fits in the station’s sound, he will add it to the mix that is generated randomly by the software that runs KoHoSo Radio 66 outside of the times when a live disk jockey is doing a show. However, even if the live Cruisin’ with KoHoSo show or any other we might have in the future is on, internet radio is not allowed to be like over-the-air radio in regard to requests (unless one wants to pay much more for rights fees and we can’t afford that). Due to the fact that internet radio can be so easily recorded digitally, stations such as KoHoSo Radio 66 are not allowed to play "on demand" requests of copyrighted music or announce in advance what specific songs will be played even in a private message. KoHoSo welcomes and encourages requests to be sent in by any of the methods listed on the Contact page…just be aware we cannot tell you in advance precisely when the request will be played.

7. How can I contact you?

All available methods are listed on our Contact page.

8. Why are some KoHoSo Radio 66 streams blocked in my country?

The usual two streaming links people outside the United States of America cannot access are our main Live365 player and our page on the Live365 site (if it is one of the others, you can skip to the next paragraph). The reason is Live365 has a deal with Amazon in the U.S.A. for revenue sharing when somebody clicks on a song they want to purchase. While KoHoSo Radio 66 does not participate in this program, the geo-block is put into effect as this deal is only with Amazon in the U.S.A. Amazon does not want, for example, somebody from the United Kingdom to buy something from the American version of their site, mainly for tax reasons. In the future, Live365 hopes to have its deal with Amazon be world-wide so everybody can enjoy the full-featured players. However, until that day comes, we mostly recommend using the media player streams, mediaU, or TuneIn so our "now playing" information can be seen.

If you have experienced a block on one of our other streams, that could occur for a number of reasons that are beyond our control. We also find very often that a listener can misinterpret a computer or internet service provider problem as a block. If you find yourself blocked from all the main links on our home page, we recommend using one of the many other websites and mobile apps that carry our station as those are usually only blocked by extra-naughty countries such as North Korea.

9. Who else besides me is listening to KoHoSo Radio 66?

KoHoSo Radio 66 has regular listeners all over the world. As you might expect, the station is most popular in countries where English is the primary language. However, we have regular listeners in every country in Europe, most countries in Central and South America, several countries in Asia, and even a few in Africa and the Middle East.

10. How do you know somebody is listening in a certain state or country?

Our host, Live365, has a feature in the control panel for this station that provides a general location for each IP address currently listening to KoHoSo Radio 66. There are other statistical pages that list overall listeners by country. It also shows all the different browsers, programs, and apps used to connect to the station.

If you are concerned about your information that is exposed to this station via Live365, please read their privacy policy here:

https://live365.com/privacy

In the future, KoHoSo Radio 66 will post its own privacy policy (likely not until early 2018 after we add an SSL certificate to this website — in non-geek terms, the thing that will make our website show up in your browser’s address bar with "https" and the lock icon). While we cannot control the Live365 portion of our service, as far as this website goes, your IP address will be noted to allow access to blog comments and as a security measure. However, unless your information is linked to an attack against this site or Live365, it will be kept secure and private. It would only be revealed if we were presented with a warrant under the laws of the United States of America or the State of California.

Please know that tracking the IP addresses that listen to KoHoSo Radio 66 is important for its ability to remain online. It is the tracking of all unique IP addresses and how long each one remains tuned in that assures music rights holders are paid their proper licensing fees.

Currently Listening screen in the KoHoSo Radio 66 Live365 Dashboard

This is the screen in the Live365 dashboard that shows us where current listeners are located. We have blacked out the IP addresses of these listeners to protect their privacy.


11. How does KoHoSo pay for the station?

KoHoSo pays for the station completely out of his own pocket from the money he makes at his regular job in the electronic components industry. The main expenses are the monthly fees paid to Live365 for streaming and music licensing plus Abovecast for the virtual Windows server from which our "signal" originates. Other items include purchases of new music and other sound files to be used on the station along with electricity for the Crestline studio and occasional maintenance of the computer KoHoSo uses for recording and live webcasting (KoHoSo builds and maintains his own computers). You do not need to donate to keep the station running although we might open a store in the future and spend any profits it makes on our monthly bills.

12. If KoHoSo Radio 66 is commercial free, why do I sometimes hear advertisements?

To add a little authentic flavor to KoHoSo Radio 66, we will occasionally play a classic, vintage radio commercial. Most of these will be local ads from various cities across the United States, and Canada. On the ones that are for nationally-known brands that still exist (including a few we have from New Zealand), we assure you we are receiving no reimbursement of any type for running them.

During our regular programming, we will always announce beforehand that we are about to play "a KoHoSo Radio 66 Commercial Blast from the Past." Any such ads played during "Cruisin’ with KoHoSo" will also be noted either before or after they are played.

13. What happened to Survive-All Shelters?

Many people that listened to KoHoSo Radio 66 during its first time online have told us they fondly remember the 1961 radio advertisements sometimes heard during our scheduled commercial breaks from Survive-All Shelters, a Columbus, Ohio company that sold nuclear fallout shelters. It has been a struggle to decide how to bring these commercials back if at all…and that doesn’t even include how to present them without confusing some listeners now that our station is commercial-free.

A lot changed in the world between when KoHoSo Radio 66 went offline on May 1, 2016 and officially returned on August 26, 2017. While we do not wish to engage in politics, we believe all would agree these ads are not as funny right now considering recent events regarding North Korea and that, once again, some folks are seriously looking at having a fallout shelter built on their property.

What has been decided for now is that we will only run them as the occasional "sponsor" of the semi-regular "Nuclear Fallout" feature on the Cruisin’ with KoHoSo program. At this time, we feel that is the proper context to allow them to still be entertaining without completely taking some listeners’ minds away from the escapism KoHoSo Radio 66 tries to offer.

If you want to listen to them more often, the Survive-All Shelters commercials are still available for free online. Especially if you have never heard these before, we suggest reading the story about Survive-All on CONELRAD Adjacent which features four of the ads via YouTube and a link at the end to the original posting where the entire series of nine ads can be heard or downloaded.

Survive-All Shelters record label

Yes, the Survive-All Shelters commercials were genuine advertisements for a real company.
This is the label from the record containing all nine of them.


14. Where did you get the old jingles?

KoHoSo has collected the old radio station jingles over a long period of time. Most of them came from compact disks he purchased many years ago. Another significant portion of the jingles have been donated to him by members of the radio industry and other collectors.

15. What is that weird computer voice in some of the jingles?

That effect was made using a device called a vocoder. While the Wikipedia article is quite detailed on its origins and many ways it has later been used in music, it completely ignores how popular it was in radio jingles from the mid 1960s into the early 1970s.

16. Is that extremely high female voice in some of the jingles real?

Yes it is. That is Glenni Tie Rutherford, a woman of Cherokee descent, with the signing voice that spans several octaves.

17. Where do you get the cover art?

Most of the cover art comes from various online sources, most notably 45cat for 45 r.p.m. singles and 45worlds for 78 r.p.m. singles and 33 1/3 r.p.m. long-playing albums. Others are from our own scans. Cover art seen with station IDs or other such items is made by KoHoSo often using various online sources.

NOTE 2017.08.17: At the present time, neither our Live365 pop-up player or web page are picking up the cover art provided by KoHoSo Radio 66. Currently, the images seen are from a third-party database used by Live365. This is due to our switch to the StationPlaylist software through which Live365 cannot yet read the file information. We will correct this in the future but cannot yet provide a date.

18. Why do I not recognize the cover art?

While there might be some rare cases that would have another answer, in most instances, this is for one of two main reasons. First, you must know that KoHoSo researches every song to which he attaches cover art to find the label or sleeve from the absolute original release of that song from the artist’s home country. For the first highlighted phrase, an example would be Chantilly Lace by the Big Bopper. As was the case with many hits of the 1950s and 1960s, that song was first issued on a small local record label; in this case, D Records in Texas. Of course, only people in the area saw that version before it was purchased and reissued by Mercury Records which is what most people would know and remember. As for the second highlighted phrase, a prime example would be the different labels used between the United States and United Kingdom. The easiest to point out here is how everybody in the States thinks of Capitol Records as being the Beatles’ main label until the Apple years while, in their home country, it was Parlophone.

NOTE 2017.08.17: At the present time, neither our Live365 pop-up player or web page are picking up the cover art provided by KoHoSo Radio 66. Currently, the images seen are from a third-party database used by Live365. This is due to our switch to the StationPlaylist software through which Live365 cannot yet read the file information. We will correct this in the future but cannot yet provide a date.

19. Why did KoHoSo Radio 66 go offline for so long?

This is a long story that we will try to make brief by skipping the part about how KoHoSo Radio 66 was unfairly taken offline by its previous web host. When that happened on May 1, 2016, KoHoSo was extremely upset and depressed that all the station’s fans could no longer listen to his vision of what an oldies station should be. Aggravating that was KoHoSo could not find another place to start a station that was legal and affordable and offered software that would make the station sound as good as it did the first time. As the months passed, he began to develop the idea for Cruisin’ with KoHoSo as a stand-alone program that he would offer for free to non-commercial over-the-air radio stations. As that planning went on into late 2016, the first news came out that Live365 was being resurrected after it was closed by its previous owners in January 2016. With the initial reports being encouraging, KoHoSo decided to wait until Live365 began accepting new stations. Once signed up with Live365, it quickly became apparent that they were not going to provide software to allow KoHoSo Radio 66 to sound the way it should with a proper mix of music and no dead air between the tracks. Thus, it took even more time to do further research and go through several rounds of trial-and-error to find the best and least-expensive way to host and mix our station with other services but still use Live365 as our streaming access point and music licensing agent. While it ended up costing KoHoSo 23% more per month than originally planned plus a big one-time expense for the professional-level software that now generates what you hear, we feel it was well worth the money and, most of all, the wait to get everything sounding just right before telling the world we were back again.

20. Do you have t-shirts or stickers available?

Not yet. We have plans to open a store in the future but they are not solid enough at this time to even guess at an opening date.

Possible KoHoSo Radio 66 and 'Cruisin' with KoHoSo' t-shirt designs.

Possible KoHoSo Radio 66 and Cruisin’ with KoHoSo t-shirt designs?


21. When can I hear Cruisin’ with KoHoSo?

Cruisin’ with KoHoSo debuts a new program every Saturday at 5:00 p.m. U.S. Pacific Time, 8:00 p.m. U.S. Eastern Time. The same show runs again on Sunday at 11:00 a.m. U.S. Pacific Time, 2:00 p.m. U.S. Eastern Time and once again on Monday at 9:00 a.m. U.S. Pacific Time, Noon U.S. Eastern Time. For those outside of North America not familiar with the main four time zones of the United States as well as when the location of KoHoSo Radio 66 changes between Standard Time and Daylight Saving Time, select Los Angeles when using your favorite website or app to convert the start time.

NOTE: Cruisin’ with KoHoSo is currently on a one-month hiatus until Christmas weekend. See the Cruisin’ page for more details.

22. What is the opening/closing theme song music used on Cruisin’ with KoHoSo?

The instrumental music used at the beginning and end of most Cruisin’ with KoHoSo programs is Crestline by the Challengers. It is a track off their 1966 album titled California Kicks and was composed by one of the group’s guitarists, Ed Fournier. We are not certain if Ed wrote the song while thinking about our home of Crestline, California but it’s a great instrumental no matter what was in his mind. We’re happy to use it as the program’s theme plus have it in the regular KoHoSo Radio 66 playlist.

23. Where did KoHoSo work in radio?

First, KoHoSo wants it to be very clear he was never anybody important or famous in over-the-air radio. However, he does want it known he was never fired for having bad ratings or suggesting what a local politician should do if he might find himself approaching a rolling doughnut.

KoHoSo worked at several stations through most of the 1980s and 1990s in the Los Angeles area as well as in Sacramento, California. He announced for a diverse range of formats: "album oriented rock" (AOR), classic rock, free form, country, standards, big band, and even hosted a show for two years devoted exclusively to the Grateful Dead. KoHoSo prefers not to list the specific stations for privacy reasons and the fact that, while KoHoSo Radio 66 bears his nom de plume, he wants the music and overall presentation of our station to be the star of our show, not himself.

24. Who is Miss KoKo?

Miss KoKo is KoHoSo’s lovely and talented female companion, honey bun, and sweetie bee.

Miss KoKo's announcement cover art

Miss KoKo’s announcement cover art

25. What happened to the computer voice announcers?

They have finally been retired.

Hot Lips Heather, Rockin’ Ryan, Dirty Daisy, Happy Harry, and Two-Minute Phil were our fictional professional announcing staff of computerized-voice announcers. They began as what was planned to be a temporary feature the first time KoHoSo Radio 66 was online. They were to be phased out once KoHoSo bought a new microphone and could replace all announcements with himself or other humans.

Upon removing them the first time in early 2016, we heard from some listeners that had come to love these voices and strongly associated them with the station. Not only did we bring them back at that time but also included them again when the station reopened in 2017.

However, as we progressed in our Live365 era and gained new listeners that had not been with us during those early days, we began to get feedback that the computer voices confused them, felt out of place in a mid-20th century environment, or were simply disliked. KoHoSo gave them all their pink slips at midnight on November 8, 2017. They did have an odd charm but KoHoSo always believed they were driving away potential listeners.

Photo from one of the massive 2016 protests against the firing of the original KoHoSo Radio 66 air staff.  Rockin' Ryan is still depressed the ditz in front didn't get his name right. - Credit: imperialgoogie

Photo from one of the massive 2016 protests against the firing of the original KoHoSo Radio 66 air staff. Rockin’ Ryan is still depressed the ditz in front
didn’t get his name right.
Credit: imperialgoogie


26. Where are Crestline and the San Bernardino Mountains?

Crestline, California is about 8 miles north of San Bernardino as the crow flies but it’s about 17 miles to drive there. It is an unincorporated town of about 10,770 full-time residents nestled in the western portion of the San Bernardino Mountains. It sits at an average elevation of 4,613 feet (1,406 meters). The San Bernardino Mountains are all of the peaks east of the Cajon Pass which is well-marked on the map below as where Interstate 15 passes through the bordering green areas marking the Angeles National Forest to the left in the San Gabriel Mountains and the San Bernardino National Forest to the right.

Crestline circled in red and its relation to the greater Los Angeles area.

Crestline circled in red and its relation to the greater Los Angeles area.


27. Why are you not on Bose SoundTouch?

KoHoSo Radio 66 is available through Bose SoundTouch. They have just made finding the station a little tricky as we are just no longer listed as a recommended station.

When you type in our "first name" into the search box, you have to enter it exactly as we spell it: KoHoSo. That’s with the K, H, and S capitalized and all the o’s in lower case. Hit the search button after typing in just "KoHoSo" and the station will appear.

How to properly search for KoHoSo Radio 66 in Bose SoundTouch

This illustrates precisely how to search for KoHoSo Radio 66 in Bose SoundTouch by typing the K, H, and S as capital letters with all the o’s in lower case. Thanks to long-time listener and personal friend Arwin K. for providing this iPhone screenshot.

The reason KoHoSo Radio 66 is no longer a "recommended station" on SoundTouch is Bose requires a "bot" to be connected to our stream at all times in order to appear in that list.

Our account with Live365 only allows KoHoSo Radio 66 a certain amount of listening hours per month. Allowing Bose to "listen" to us 24/7 would take almost half of our monthly allotment.

We apologize for the inconvenience of not having KoHoSo Radio 66 in the SoundTouch recommended stations list. There will likely come a day when we will have to start paying for a Live365 package with more hours as the number of listeners expands. We just don’t want that extra expense until it is for actual human listeners.

28. What equipment, programs, and services do you use?

This is what KoHoSo uses that is most related to running this station. KoHoSo Radio 66 is not reimbursed by any company listed below.

  • computer: self-built desktop always running the latest version of Linux Mint MATE 64-bit
  • microphone: Blue Yeti USB with shock-mount and pop screen
  • audio software: Audacity (also available for Windows and Mac)
  • mp3 tagging and cover art: EasyTAG (for Windows users, we recommend Mp3tag)
  • speakers: Creative Inspire P7800 90 Watts 7.1
  • headphones: Nady Audio QH-200 (cheap but get the job done)
  • streaming service and music licensing: Live365
  • Windows virtual server host: Abovecast ("Small" level)
  • station management software: StationPlaylist Creator Pro and Studio Pro
  • RDP client for Linux: Remmina
29. What is the secret that makes KoHoSo Radio 66 so good compared to other oldies stations?

Before we answer…yes, we have actually been asked this question many times. We believe there are three main factors that make KoHoSo Radio 66 stand out among the crowded field of oldies stations.

First, KoHoSo Radio 66 has a very deep but carefully selected playlist that grows larger almost every day. Unlike other oldies stations that play a limited number of hits, this keeps things fresh even though these songs are so old and mostly well known.

Second, we don’t bombard you with a jingle, ID, or promo between every song. We consider these items like a strong spice that should be used sparingly so they do not overwhelm the overall musical dish.

Third…well, here is where we put the old joke of, "We could tell you, but then we’d have to kill you." We will give you a hint and say it has to do with how the songs are arranged in the daily playlist. The funny thing is it’s actually so simple we are amazed no oldies station we have ever heard has done things the way KoHoSo does. In fact, we’ve heard a few stations that have a very similar overall playlist to ours and they still don’t mix the songs together in a way that gives people the kind of feelings they tell us they get from KoHoSo Radio 66.

If you think you’ve figured out this secret, send us a message and we’ll answer honestly if you got it right. We’ll send you a free t-shirt and sticker if we have them by then.